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  • Sellers: See what is your home is worth

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  • Selling Q&A

    • What are the advantages of owning a home?

      There are many. Among the most appealing: you own it, which gives you, instead of a landlord, control of your living space. Other benefits stem from potential tax savings and the build up of equity as your property likely appreciates in price over time. Equity can be used to help put children through college, purchase a second home, or make home improvements.

      The mortgage interest paid on a home loan is tax deductible, as is the local property tax. If you get a fixed-rate home mortgage loan, you also can invest more wisely knowing your monthly mortgage payment, unlike rent, will not change substantially.



    • What is the first step to buying a home?

      Make sure you are ready - psychologically and financially. Ask yourself the following questions: Do I have steady income? Is my debt lower than my total income? Do I have enough money to pay for the down payment and closing costs? Am I working hard enough to improve bad credit?

      A house needs constant care and attention. Also ask yourself if your budget will allow for unexpected repairs and upkeep. Once you can honestly answer "yes" to these questions, you are several steps ahead of the game and that much closer to becoming a homeowner.



    • How much can I afford?

      The general rule of thumb is that you can buy a home that costs about two-and-one-half times your annual salary. A good REALTOR® or lender can determine how much you can afford and estimate the maximum monthly payment based on the loan amount, taxes, insurance and other expenses.



    • Is it best to save for the ultimate dream home or begin with a less expensive starter home?

      It can take a long time to save for that perfect dream home. Meanwhile, the market has been flooded with some of the most favorable mortgage interest rates in years. Low rates make housing more affordable, which is why so many buyers have jumped on the home buying bandwagon.

      Home-price appreciation has also been strong, making very solid gains in communities across the country. In fact, home prices are expected to increase 2.5 percent to 3 percent annually over the next five years.

      If you purchase a starter home today, you can potentially begin to build value that can lead to the purchase of a larger, or more desirable, trade-up home in the future.



    • How do you decide whether to add on to an existing home or purchase a new one?

      There are a few things to consider, including cost, individual needs, and what will add value down the road. Also important: your emotional attachment to the existing home. As designer and builder Philip S. Wenz, the author of Adding to a House: Planning, Design & Construction, notes, an addition is much cheaper than building a new home and can offer a "new" home without the heartache of moving.

      Other considerations:

      • Can you finance the home improvement with your own cash or will you need a loan?
      • How much equity is in the property? A fair amount will make it that much easier to get a loan for home improvements.
      • Is it feasible to expand the current space for an addition?
      • What is permissible under local zoning and building laws? Despite your deep yearning for a new sunroom or garage, you will need to know if your town or city will allow such improvements.
      • Are there affordable properties for sale that would satisfy your changing housing needs?
      Explore your options. Make sure your decision is one you can live with - either under the same roof or under a different one.

  • Monthly Help Videos

  • Monthly Home Ownership Tips

    • Is it true you never really stop fixing up a home?

      From the day you move in to the day you sell your home, there will always be something that will need to be repaired or remodeled. You may want to undertake some changes simply to elevate your comfort level - like installing central air conditioning - or spruce up the home's aesthetics, such as adding a few stained-glass windows.

      But other work will need to be done to maintain the property and minimize problems later on. For example, replacing a hazardous roof, fixing broken windows, and repairing leaky pipes. These are all necessities. Left undone, they can lead to major problems and damages within the home.

      If you decide one day to sell, other improvements will likely be made to increase the home's value and appeal to potential buyers.



    • Is there anything I should pay special attention to?

      From the very beginning, get in the habit of taking an inventory at least once every year of every nook and cranny of your home to check for potential problems. Examine the roof, foundation, plumbing, electrical wiring - basically everything. Try to fix trouble spots as soon as you uncover them. This proactive approach will help you avoid larger expenses later on, so leave no stone unturned when taking your inventory.



    • What about the unseen problems like toxic gases?

      Problems with your chimney, mechanical devices on your heating appliance, and pressure within the home can all cause combustion spillage, the unwanted flow of combustion gases into your home. Present in these gases are toxic elements such as carbon monoxide, sulfur dioxide, and nitrogen oxides.

      The best way to prevent spillage is to hire a professional - preferably one who specializes in building inspection, indoor air quality, ducting, chimneys and heating equipment - to do a yearly maintenance check of all your combustion appliances. These appliances include a gas-fired furnace, boiler, or water heater, an oil-fired furnace, boiler, or water heater, and a fireplace.The service professional can check for heat exchanger leakage, evidence of start up spillage, and condensation in the chimney. Maintenance normally includes a tune-up, or in the case of a chimney, clearing it of debris and fixing cracks on the inside wall.



    • How much, on average, can I expect to spend on maintenance?

      Expect to spend one percent of the purchase price of your home every year to handle a myriad of tasks, including painting, tree trimming, repairing gutters, caulking windows, and routine system repairs and maintenance.An older home will usually require more maintenance, although a lot will depend on how well it has been maintained over the years.

      Tell yourself that the upkeep of your home is mandatory, and budget accordingly. Otherwise, your home's value will suffer if you allow it to fall into a state of disrepair. Remember, there is usually a direct link between a property's condition and its market value: The better its condition, the more a buyer will likely pay for it down the road.

      Also, adopt the attitude that the cost of good home maintenance is usually minor compared to what it will cost to remedy a situation that you allowed to get out of hand. For example, unclogging and sealing gutters may cost a few hundred dollars. But repairing damage to a corner of your home where gutters have leaked can potentially cost several thousands dollars.



    • What are the main reasons why homeowners remodel?

      There are many reasons. Home remodeling can improve the appearance of your home, enhance its value, add to your quality of life, and appeal to future homebuyers. According to a recent survey by the National Association of Home Builders, the top four reasons homeowners remodel is to obtain more space, avoid buying a new home, enjoy more amenities, and adjust to lifestyle changes.



  • Want a Market Analysis on your home: Request more Information

  • Glossary of Terms

    • Acceleration clause

      Stipulation in a mortgage agreement that allows the lender to demand immediate payment of the entire loan balance if any scheduled payment is missed.

    • Adjustable rate mortgage (ARM)

      Mortgage loan on which the interest rate falls and rises with changes in prevailing rates. The mortgage rate is tied to a selected index and may be adjusted annually. Also called a variable rate mortgage.

    • Agent

      Person authorized to act by and on behalf of another.

    • Air rights

      Right to occupy and use the open space above a parcel of land or property, such as in the leasing of air space over existing buildings or highways.

    • Amortize

      Pay a debt in monthly or other periodic installments until the total amount, along with the interest, if any, is paid.

  • Daily Consumer News

    • Amazing New Uses for Your Kitchen Gadgets

      Love her or hate her, you can’t deny the household magic of Martha Stewart. Before you get sucked into spending your hard-earned disposable dollars on some alluring kitchen gadget, check out Martha’s creative uses for the utensils you already have in your drawers. Life changing!

      A slotted spoon to separate eggs. Tired of eggshells in your cake batter? If your egg-separating skills are less than stellar, try balancing a slotted spoon over a bowl, crack the egg into the spoon and the egg white will simply collect in the bowl below!

      A rolling pin to crush stuff. Use it to quickly pulverize nuts, candy, ice and any other hard substance that needs to be miniaturized fast!

      A box grater for soap. You know those tiny bits of soap that make a mess in your shower when the bar gets too small? Use a cheese grater to make them into a fine powder that can then be formed into a new ball of soap.

      Sieve as splatter guard. Hate how grease splatters everywhere when you’re frying something? Place a sieve over the frying pan and voila - no more mess.

      Tongs as juicer. Want to get more juice out of your lemons and limes? Cut one in half then place it between the arms of a pair of tongs. Press down firmly on the clamps of the tongs and watch the juice flow.

      Cookie cutters as napkin rings. Those cute cookie cutters that only make an appearance once or twice a year can now get some time center stage as napkin rings. Stars, pumpkins, hearts and a variety of other shapes will work well in many dinner settings.

      Published with permission from RISMedia.



    • Tips for Stocking and Maintaining Your Medicine Cabinet

      Many of us have old bottles and boxes that hang around in our medicine cabinet for years. However, keeping on top of the products in your medicine cabinet can make or break an oncoming bout of flu or fever. Below are a handful of tips from MultiVu for stocking and maintaining your arsenal.

      When in doubt, throw it out. Once you've opened a medication the clock starts ticking on its shelf life. Items like that are usually good for about a year from when they're opened. Regularly check the expiration date on your product.

      Everyday basics. A variety of illnesses are common during the winter months. Basics include good oral hygiene and it's very important and it starts with clean teeth.   

      Must-haves for flu season. No one wants a cold to persist, so don't let it slow you down. Medical studies have shown that zinc gluconate, which is found in lozenges such as Cold-EEZE, shortens the duration of a cold so you can feel better faster.

      Other essentials. While antibiotics are often used to treat cold and flu, they can disrupt your balance of friendly and unfriendly bacteria, creating digestive discomfort. Probiotics are a great medicine cabinet staple because they help balance healthy bacteria levels in your gut and, since 70 percent of your immune system lives in your digestive tract, they support a healthy immune system as well. When choosing a probiotic, look for the dosing information, otherwise known as the CFU count. CFUs refer to the number of good bacteria in the supplement. For example, on the lower end, probiotics with 2 billion CFU can help support everyday digestive health, while additional CFUs on the higher end can help bolster immune support.

      Storing and discarding. Rethink where you keep your medicines. Humidity from steamy showers can expedite the expiry of medication. It's best to keep them in a child-safe, dry, and cool place. And landfill sites and water supplies have become contaminated with discarded medicines. Participating in a community drug take back program or a trip to the pharmacy are the best ways to discard old or unneeded medications.

      Source: MultiVu

      Published with permission from RISMedia.



    • Non-Candy Halloween Treats Kids Actually Love

      Armies of Moms have puzzled over the years about non-candy Halloween giveaways that will bring a smile to the most discerning little ghosts and goblins.

      The fact is, for most young children, the fun of trick-or-treating door-to-door in costume is more exciting than the treats they happen to collect – and many parents confiscate most of the sweet stuff anyway once it reaches home.  

      A panel of parents brainstorming at a PTA meeting in California came up with a formidable list of stuff that makes a great alternative to candy treats.

      More good ideas can likely be found at your nearby dollar store.

      Food treats:

      Juice boxes – Little trick or treaters can work up a thirst. Be sure to choose no-sugar added juices.

      Fruit cups – Tie a black or orange ribbon around individual cups of applesauce or other cut-up fruit.  

      Granola bars – Kids never get tired of these chewy little treats. Seasonal pumpkin-flavored varieties are available.

      Raisins – Those tiny little boxes of raisins seem to appeal to kids of all ages.

      Baked chips – They may be fairly empty calories, but they‘re a sugarless, kid-friendly treat.

      Non-food treats:

      Slime – little plastic containers of slime are a natural pick for the icky Halloween season.

      Plastic body parts – Little kids are sure to get a kick out of plastic lips, noses, or fingernails.

      Action figures – These or other small toys, such as Hot Wheels cars, are favored by  kids and great for trading.

      Instant tattoos – Wash-off Halloween tattoos are widely available at this time of the year.

      Play-doh – Individual containers of colorful Play-doh are a hit no matter the time of year.

      Bubbles – Another perennial favorite, plastic bottles of magic bubbles are  a treat for most younger kids.

      Stickers – You’ll find vast arrays of popular Halloween-themed stickers at almost any toy, drug or big-box store.

      Published with permission from RISMedia.



    • 4 Tire Safety Tips for Winter

      (Family Features)--The same temperature you can begin to see your breath - 45 degrees F - is also when the all-season tires on your car can start to lose traction and grip.

      As temperatures drop, drivers should remember that if you can see your breath, you should think about winter tires. Whether you're planning a cross-country trek or simply driving to and from work daily, exposing your vehicle's tires to colder weather could lead to potential trouble on the road.

      Snow and ice may be fun to play in, but they make for dangerous driving conditions. Winter tires are built for cold-weather conditions and deliver improved starting, stopping and steering control in temperatures 45 degrees F and below. The difference is the tread compound of winter tires, which stays soft and pliable in colder temperatures for superior traction. Add the tread design of winter tires with thousands of extra gripping edges and you get as much as a 25-50 percent increase in traction over all-season tires.

      To help stay safe on the road this winter, the experts at Discount Tire recommend following these four tire safety tips:

      1. Get ready now. It is important to replace all four of your vehicle's all-season tires with winter tires if you regularly drive in temperatures 45 degrees F or below, snow or no snow. Winter tires are made of a softer rubber that allows the tires to stay pliable and maintain better contact with the road through winter weather conditions.

      2. Don't forget the wheels. Having a set of wheels specifically for your winter tires can save you money in the long run. Pairing a separate set of wheels with your winter tires can eliminate certain changeover costs and save your everyday wheels from the wear and tear brought on by ice, slush, snow and salt during the winter months.

      3. Know your numbers. Check your tire pressure at least once a month to make sure tires are at the appropriate inflation level. Temperature changes affect tire pressure - for every 10 degrees of temperature change, tire air pressure changes one pound per square inch. Low tire pressure can lead to decreased steering and braking control, poor gas mileage, excessive tire wear and the possibility of tire failure. Also don't forget to check your spare tire.

      4. Rotate, rotate, rotate. To help increase tread life and smooth out your ride, rotate your tires every 6,000 miles or sooner if irregular or uneven wear develops.

      Source: Discount Tire

      Published with permission from RISMedia.



    • Homeowner Prevention in the Age of Devastating Wildfires

      Fire safety does not always begin in the home; that stove left on accidentally or faulty electric wiring aren't the only fire dangers when it comes to home protection. Wildfires can be equally as devastating and, depending on where you live, a higher threat.

      Experts at the Tree Care Industry Association, Inc. (Treecaretips.org) revealed homeowners can protect their properties in two ways: by designing and maintaining a landscape that discourages fires; and by building with flame-resistant materials.

      Tchukki Andersen, staff arborist at TCIA, offers these tips for landscaping to combat wildfires:
      - If you are in a wildfire-prone area, reduce the amount of potential fuel around your home. Provide enough tree- and shrub-free space between your home and the undeveloped land.

      - All dead branches that hang over your roof should be removed. Leaves, needles and other dead vegetation should not be allowed to build up on the roof or in gutters.

      - In parts of the country where wildfires are rare but still possible, an area of well-irrigated vegetation should extend at least 30 feet from your home on all sides. In high-hazard areas, a clearance of between 50 and 100 feet or more may be necessary – especially on downhill sides of the lot.

      - Further from the house, install low-growing shrubs. When planting trees, space them no closer than 10 feet apart. Beyond 100 feet from the house, dead wood and older trees should be removed or thinned by qualified professionals.

      - The lower limbs of tall shade trees should be pruned 6 feet above the ground. Careful pruning preserves a tree’s appearance, enhances structural integrity and assists in the plant’s ability to resist fire.

      In addition to pruning, Andersen says a professional arborist can recommend fertilization, soil management, disease treatment or pest control measures to promote healthy trees. He suggests that if your area is in a drought or prone to wildfires, hire a tree care professional to assess your landscape and reduce the fuel wildfires need to burn.

      Published with permission from RISMedia.



  • Buyers: Ck out our featured Properties

    • 212 CORNWALL DR CHALFONT, PA 212 CORNWALL DR, CHALFONT, PA Single Family | Detached for sale. $289,900 
    • 367 MANOR CIR HARLEYSVILLE, PA 367 MANOR CIR, HARLEYSVILLE, PA Condo/Townhome | Townhouse/Row for sale. $325,000 
    • 564 KIMBERTON RD #C PHOENIXVILLE, PA 564 KIMBERTON RD #C, PHOENIXVILLE, PA Commercial for sale. $950 
    • 1052 DENSTON DR AMBLER, PA 1052 DENSTON DR, AMBLER, PA Single Family | Detached for sale. $574,900 
    • 509 HARLEYSVILLE PIKE HARLEYSVILLE, PA 509 HARLEYSVILLE PIKE, HARLEYSVILLE, PA Single Family | Detached for sale. $319,900 
    • 1912 KOFFEL RD HATFIELD, PA 1912 KOFFEL RD, HATFIELD, PA Single Family | Detached for sale. $309,900 
    • 98 N TOWNSHIP LINE RD ROYERSFORD, PA 98 N TOWNSHIP LINE RD, ROYERSFORD, PA Single Family | Detached for sale. $1,500 
    • 101 W HAMLIN AVE TELFORD, PA 101 W HAMLIN AVE, TELFORD, PA Single Family | Semi-Detached for sale. $215,000 
    • 30 BEACON HILL DR PHOENIXVILLE, PA 30 BEACON HILL DR, PHOENIXVILLE, PA Single Family | Detached for sale. $550,000 
    • 611 MORRIS RD EAST GREENVILLE, PA 611 MORRIS RD, EAST GREENVILLE, PA Condo/Townhome | Townhouse/Row for sale. $150,000 
    • 120 N 9TH ST QUAKERTOWN, PA 120 N 9TH ST, QUAKERTOWN, PA Single Family | Detached for sale. $213,000 Price reduced from $220,000 (-$7,000)
    • 2109 DEEP CREEK RD PERKIOMENVILLE, PA 2109 DEEP CREEK RD, PERKIOMENVILLE, PA Single Family | Detached for sale. $350,000 
    • 922 SEQUOIA RD PHILADELPHIA, PA 922 SEQUOIA RD, PHILADELPHIA, PA Single Family | Detached for sale. $548,500 
    • 1549 MOSELEM SPRINGS RD HAMBURG, PA 1549 MOSELEM SPRINGS RD, HAMBURG, PA Lot/Land for sale. $300,000 
    • 1000 N GRAVEL PIKE SCHWENKSVILLE, PA 1000 N GRAVEL PIKE, SCHWENKSVILLE, PA Single Family | Detached for sale. $1,100 
    • 286 PARKVIEW DR SOUDERTON, PA 286 PARKVIEW DR, SOUDERTON, PA Condo/Townhome | Townhouse/Row for sale. $190,000 
    • 232 PARKVIEW CT HARLEYSVILLE, PA 232 PARKVIEW CT, HARLEYSVILLE, PA Single Family | Detached for sale. $409,000 Price reduced from $424,900 (-$15,900)
    • 602 GREENTREE LN NORRISTOWN, PA 602 GREENTREE LN, NORRISTOWN, PA Condo/Townhome | Townhouse/Row for sale. $195,000 
    • 2700 SHELLY RD HARLEYSVILLE, PA 2700 SHELLY RD, HARLEYSVILLE, PA Commercial for sale. $2,800 
    • 1314 S TOWNSHIP LINE RD ROYERSFORD, PA 1314 S TOWNSHIP LINE RD, ROYERSFORD, PA Single Family | Detached for sale. $299,900 
  • Search the Mls for Houses for sale

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    School District School District, County, PA
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    Address 123 Main St, Devon, PA
    Street Main St, Devon, PA
    Listing ID #123456
  • Search for School information on a home you like

    Before you purchase a new home it is always a good idea to research the schools in the surrounding area. The quality and/or proximity of the schools surrounding your home may significantly impact its resale value.

    Select a city to view a comprehensive list of all public and private schools that are available in the area.


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  • Buying Q&A

    • What are the advantages of owning a home?

      There are many. Among the most appealing: you own it, which gives you, instead of a landlord, control of your living space. Other benefits stem from potential tax savings and the build up of equity as your property likely appreciates in price over time. Equity can be used to help put children through college, purchase a second home, or make home improvements.

      The mortgage interest paid on a home loan is tax deductible, as is the local property tax. If you get a fixed-rate home mortgage loan, you also can invest more wisely knowing your monthly mortgage payment, unlike rent, will not change substantially.



    • What is the first step to buying a home?

      Make sure you are ready - psychologically and financially. Ask yourself the following questions: Do I have steady income? Is my debt lower than my total income? Do I have enough money to pay for the down payment and closing costs? Am I working hard enough to improve bad credit?

      A house needs constant care and attention. Also ask yourself if your budget will allow for unexpected repairs and upkeep. Once you can honestly answer "yes" to these questions, you are several steps ahead of the game and that much closer to becoming a homeowner.



    • How much can I afford?

      The general rule of thumb is that you can buy a home that costs about two-and-one-half times your annual salary. A good REALTOR® or lender can determine how much you can afford and estimate the maximum monthly payment based on the loan amount, taxes, insurance and other expenses.



    • Is it best to save for the ultimate dream home or begin with a less expensive starter home?

      It can take a long time to save for that perfect dream home. Meanwhile, the market has been flooded with some of the most favorable mortgage interest rates in years. Low rates make housing more affordable, which is why so many buyers have jumped on the home buying bandwagon.

      Home-price appreciation has also been strong, making very solid gains in communities across the country. In fact, home prices are expected to increase 2.5 percent to 3 percent annually over the next five years.

      If you purchase a starter home today, you can potentially begin to build value that can lead to the purchase of a larger, or more desirable, trade-up home in the future.



    • How do you decide whether to add on to an existing home or purchase a new one?

      There are a few things to consider, including cost, individual needs, and what will add value down the road. Also important: your emotional attachment to the existing home. As designer and builder Philip S. Wenz, the author of Adding to a House: Planning, Design & Construction, notes, an addition is much cheaper than building a new home and can offer a "new" home without the heartache of moving.

      Other considerations:

      • Can you finance the home improvement with your own cash or will you need a loan?
      • How much equity is in the property? A fair amount will make it that much easier to get a loan for home improvements.
      • Is it feasible to expand the current space for an addition?
      • What is permissible under local zoning and building laws? Despite your deep yearning for a new sunroom or garage, you will need to know if your town or city will allow such improvements.
      • Are there affordable properties for sale that would satisfy your changing housing needs?
      Explore your options. Make sure your decision is one you can live with - either under the same roof or under a different one.

  • Financing Q&A

    • What is a mortgage and how does it work?

      A mortgage makes homeownership possible for most people. In the simplest terms, it is a loan that is secured by real property. The lender holds title to the home until the loan is completely repaid. If you fail to pay up, the lender has a right to take the property, sell it, and recover the money that is owed.

      The amount of a mortgage will vary greatly depending on the down payment you make to reduce the amount of money that is needed to finance the home. You may put as much money down as you like, or you can sometimes pay as little as 3 to 5% of the purchase price, or sometimes nothing at all. The more you put down, the more you reduce the amount that is financed, thereby lowering your monthly payment.

      The monthly payment consists of both principal and interest but also typically includes additional amounts to cover property taxes and insurance-specifically hazard insurance and private mortgage insurance, the latter of which is required for down payments less than 20% of the purchase price.

      Home buyers in the U.S. have access to several different types of mortgage loans.



    • How do I qualify for a home loan?

      Top 5 Members have information on lender loan requirements and will be able to calculate a rough monthly figure you can afford based on the maximum monthly payment for the loan, taxes, insurance, and any type of maintenance fees. This pre-purchase evaluation by the agent can save you a lot of time spent looking at properties you cannot afford.

      Lenders also routinely calculate what you can afford and can pre-qualify you for a loan even before you begin your home search. This way, you know exactly how much you can afford to buy.

      Lenders generally stipulate that you spend no more than 28% of your gross monthly income on a mortgage payment or 36% on total debts.

      Ultimately, the price you can afford to pay for a home will also depend on other factors besides your gross income and outstanding debts. They include the amount of cash you have available for the down payment, your credit history, current interest rates, closing costs and cash reserves required by the lender, and the type of mortgage you select.



    • What's the best way to choose a home loan?

      A lot will depend on the length of time you plan to live in the home, other financial obligations, and potential savings gained from comparing the monthly costs of a home against the upfront costs and closing costs involved with a particular loan.

      Also, you will need to be comfortable with whatever choice you decide to make. Trust your instincts and do not be pressured into signing for a loan that will not really work for you.



    • Where can I get a mortgage?

      You can get a home loan from several different sources-a credit union, commercial bank, mortgage company, finance company, government agency, thrift (which includes savings banks and savings & loan associations), mortgage broker, and even the seller.

      Note, however, that most lenders have tightened their credit standards in light of increasing foreclosures and higher delinquency rates. Begin your search by calling at least half a dozen lenders to inquire about the types of financing available, current rates on each loan type, loan origination fees and number of points, other loan features and their credit requirements for borrowers.

      Once you actually apply for a mortgage, the lender will pull a recent copy of your credit report. That inquiry and any and all others are recorded and become a part of your credit file. Normally, several inquiries during a short period are viewed negatively, as a sign you are trying to open several new accounts. Such a move lowers your credit scores; and lower credit scores mean you will be offered a higher mortgage interest rate.

      However, there is a caveat. Credit scoring software generally detect that you are shopping for a single mortgage, if you shop within a short, 30-day window. So multiple inquires pulled roughly within this time frame will only count as one inquiry and should not affect your FICO or credit score.

      Checking your own score also will not lower your credit score.



    • What does a mortgage broker do?

      Much like a stockbroker helps you buy stocks, a mortgage broker can help you purchase a home loan. Because the broker has access to many lenders, you will be able to select from a wide variety of loan types and terms that fit your specific needs.

      Note, however, that brokers are not obligated to find the best deal for you. Of course, if you agree in writing to have one act as your agent, that is an entirely different story. This is why it is important when looking for a broker to contact more than one, just as you would any other lender.

      Compare their fees and ask questions, particularly about how they will be paid. Sometimes their fees appear as points paid at closing or the compensation is factored into the interest rate, or both. In any event, haggle with the broker and the lender for the best deal.

      Real estate agents normally maintain contact with several brokers. Ask your Top 5 Member for recommendations.



  • Home Matters Articles

    • In this Edition: Get Crafty With Simple Do-It-Yourself Fall Decor Projects

      Our lead story in this month’s Home Matters examines simple crafts you can create with your own two hands to spruce up your home this season. Other topics covered this month include simple steps to make sure your home is prepared for Mother Nature's fury and how you can create more livable space within your home without taking on a major renovation. We hope you enjoy this month’s edition of Home Matters and as always, we welcome your feedback. Email us anytime!

      Published with permission from RISMedia.



    • Do-It-Yourself Fall Decor for the Decidedly Uncrafty

      Are you feeling less than competent in the arts and crafts department? This can be especially difficult in the fall, the season that tends to kick off the DIY bonanza. The great news is, homemade décor projects have gotten a lot more creative and a lot simpler, making crafting accessible to even the less skilled among us. Here are some simple ideas with stunning results. Not only do you get a lovely little objet d’art for your home, but the made-it-myself bragging rights to boot.

      • Glam gourds. Sure, a well-placed pumpkin or two is always a nice touch this time of year, but paint them gold and you’ve suddenly got a magical design statement. For smaller gourds, use a paintbrush and some gold leaf paint; for the larger variety, get out a drop cloth and the spray paint.
      • Fall topiaries. Nope, you don’t need to be Edward Scissorhands. Just grab an inexpensive clay pot or basket and fill it with florist’s foam. Then snip a few branches from a colorful fall tree or berry bush and arrange them in the foam. Keep the foam slightly damp, and your fall topiary will live indoors for several days.
      • Chalkboard welcome. This great idea from Country Living involves taking a decorative tray (the kind with handles) and painting the center of it with chalkboard paint. Write a pleasant welcome message for guests on it—or leave a space for guests to write their own note—then decorate the handles and edge with fall leaves or berry vines. Hang it vertically on your front door for a creative alternative to a wreath.
      • Harvest votives. This quick idea from Martha Stewart involves taking a piece of dried corn husk—the kind from Indian corn is most colorful—and wrapping it around a small glass votive by tying it with a small piece of twine. Once the candle is lit within, the effect of the translucent husk is simply lovely.
      • Pumpkin pie potpourri. Another ridiculously easy but brilliant idea from Martha Stewart, this craft involves taking a smallish pumpkin, cutting the top off to form a lid and thoroughly cleaning out the inside. From there, carve round vents into the lid and base of the pumpkin with an apple corer. Next, push cloves into the lid and rub it with cinnamon or pumpkin pie spices. Light a tea candle, place the lid back on the pumpkin and enjoy the smell of pumpkin pie spice for about six hours. 
      Aside from lovely crafts you’ll produce, the best part of these projects is the opportunity they provide to immerse yourself in the season. Grab your kids, your bestie, or even mom and dad and craft away together for even more fun.
       
      If you’d like more information about homeownership, please contact me.

      Published with permission from RISMedia.



    • Is Your Home Prepared for an Emergency?

      If there’s anything we’ve learned over the years, it’s that Mother Nature is unpredictable and fierce, and that no one is safe from her path.

      But there are steps every homeowner could and should take to prepare for a natural disaster. Gold Medal Service, a New Jersey-based heating, cooling, plumbing and electrical service company advises taking the following steps to make sure your home is storm-ready:

      Waterproof low-lying areas. Basements are particularly susceptible to water issues, so look into a variety of solutions, such as pump systems, waterproof sprays and interior drainage systems. 

      Install or inspect generators. While going without power may seem like an inconvenience, it’s actually a serious safety issue. A backup generator is a great alternative power source, however, make sure it's professionally installed and periodically inspected.

      Have your heating system inspected. Make sure the flues and vents throughout your heating systems are clean and clear of debris. Blocked vents can cause a dangerous carbon monoxide build-up in your home. Have a professional conduct the inspection if you're unsure how to do so.

      Install and inspect alarms. Carbon monoxide and smoke alarms are a life-saving must, however, if they're not functioning properly, it defeats the purpose. Make sure the batteries are fresh, and bring in a professional inspector to ensure everything is working properly.   

      In addition to having your home’s systems inspected and ready to go, have the following in place for you and your family:

      • Water, flashlights, extra food and other necessities, such as medicines and eyeglasses
      • A solar charger for your cellphone
      • A battery-powered radio
      • A list of your city's emergency shelters
      • An updated insurance policy with adequate coverage
      • A rehearsed plan for what your family will do in the event of an emergency 
      Source: Gold Medal Service

      If you’d like more homeowner information, please contact me.

      Published with permission from RISMedia.



    • The 4 Ds of a Successful Open House

      If you recently listed your home for sale, your real estate agent might be planning to host an open house in the near future. Here are some ways you can help your home put its best foot forward:

      1. Depersonalize. Put away all personal photos, drawings from your children that are hanging on the fridge, birthday cards on the mantel and anything else that too closely connects you to your home. You want potential buyers to envision it as their home, and they can’t effectively do that if your presence is too pervasive.
      2. Declutter. This seems obvious, but we’re talking about more than just straightening up. Decluttering means getting rid of as much as you possibly can, making kitchen and bath counters, dining and accent tables, bureaus and bookcases as stark as possible. All you want to leave in place is the minimum necessary for décor, i.e., a vase of flowers, a coffee-table book or two, or an attractive bowl of sea shells…but not too many.
      3. Deodorize. Don’t try to cover up offensive smells with a spray or scented candle. Instead, get rid of them altogether with a deep clean. Call in a professional, if necessary. Bear in mind, you’ve gotten used to your home’s odors—good and bad—so adhere to your agent’s third-party opinion.
      4. Depart. Unless your agent instructs otherwise, make sure you’re not around for the open house. You want prospective buyers to freely inspect the ins and outs of your home and ask questions at will, without your potentially inhibiting presence. 
      If you need more real estate information, feel free to contact me.

      Published with permission from RISMedia.



    • There's No Such Thing As a Vacation From Social Media

      If you didn't post it on your social media channels, did it even happen? As social media continues to influence the way people travel, the recently released Travelzoo® Fall Travel Trends Survey uncovered that travelers are finding themselves at a crossroads between FOMO (fear of missing out) and the desire for relaxation, torn between their need to share their vacation adventures on social media and a wish to digitally disconnect while away.

      FOMO, in fact, appears to be impacting travel decisions, as more than half (53 percent) of respondents said they feel pressure to book unique or exotic vacations, and 40 percent feel pressure to take more adventurous vacations. In fact, adventure is a growing theme among travelers, with one in six respondents feeling compelled to be more adventurous than they really are, while one in three (34 percent) feel a vacation is actually wasted without adventurous experiences. Younger travelers were most likely to say they felt they had wasted time on vacation, with 24 percent of millennials and 29 percent of Gen Xers saying they didn't experience enough at their vacation destination.

      Much of this drive for fun is influenced by how vacation photos translate on social media. Nearly half (47 percent) of those surveyed agree that social media is driving up the need to experience more on vacation, and almost a third (30 percent) of travelers are booking trips based on whether they think the destination or activity will serve up visually compelling social media content.

      Despite the desire to put up a positive and exciting front on social media, there's a growing interest in trips that allow travelers to disconnect even more. In fact, half of respondents said cutting digital ties enhances the appeal of a trip. Rationale for wanting to cut the cord was due to feeling they check email too often (28 percent), are jaded by the news (27 percent), and feel too tied to a phone (22 percent). With the mounting stresses of everyday life, it's not surprising that the top goals of most travelers are still relaxing (56 percent) and enjoying great food (44 percent).

      Regardless of age, nearly half of respondents (44 percent) feel an original or meaningful experience is important when booking a vacation. Spiritual benefits or personal growth resonates with a quarter of all respondents, with Gen Zers (58 percent) and millennials (39 percent) placing more emphasis on those outcomes than baby boomers (18 percent) or those born before 1946 (28 percent).

      Source: Travelzoo

      If you’d like more homeowner information, please contact me.

      Published with permission from RISMedia.



  • Office Location: 418 Main St, Harleysville

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  • Patricia O'Herrick

    Vice President / Associate Broker Harleysville Office

    (215) 256-6543

    (267) 718-0202

    Email Me

    AB-067879

    Patricia has been in real estate over 20 years. She has lived and work in this area her whole life. She is actively involved in her church and volunteering in her community. She has a heart for serving her clients and giving back.  Her background has always been in management and sales. She has several real estate designations, both state and nationally recognized, that give her the expertise she needs to represent her clients successfully.

    - Sellers love her dedication, marketing plans and pricing that gets their house sold.
    - Buyers appreciate both the time, energy and care that she puts into finding just the right home for them.
    - Her certified negotiation skills aide in all areas, giving her clients the most for their money.
     
    Patricia's experience and expertise is joined by her caring and fun personality. Her clients love her and continue to come to her for all their real estate needs.